The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have begun construction on a pumping station which will be capable of moving 150,000 gallons or floodwater per second back into the sea:

The $500-million station-the newest installment of a $14-billion federal project to fortify the Big Easy against the type of fierce storm the city sees once in 100 years-will protect the 240,000 residents living in New Orleans, a high-risk flood area because of its nearby shipping canals. The Gulf Intracoastal Waterway is one of the city's most trafficked industrial waterwats, but it provides a perfect path from the Gulf for a 16-foot storm surge to flood homes and businesses. When a major storm threatens, the waterway's new West Closure Complex will mount a two-point defense. First, operators will shut the 32-foot-tall, 225-foot-wide metal gates to block the surge. Then they'll fire up the world's largest pumping station, which pulls 150,000 gallons of floodwater per second. And unlike the city's notorious levees, the WCC won't break when residents need it most. "This station is designed to withstand almost everything," including 140mph winds and runaway barges, says Time Connel, the U.S Army Corps of Engineers's project manager for the complex.

Source: Popular Science